Emerging Role of Microbiome in Neurological Disease

Date/Time: Tuesday, October 15, 2019 - 8:45 AM – 10:45 AM
Level: Plenary Session
Room: Majestic D
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Description:

The last 10 years has seen a rapid advance in our knowledge of our partner organisms, the microbiome. The microbiome is now emerging as an important player across a range of human diseases, especially in neurological disease. Thus clinicians, researchers and patients are motivated to understand the complex nature of the microbiota, and its influence on human metabolism and immunity.
Several lines of evidence indicate that gut bacteria play a role in age-related neurodegeneration: the early onset of constipation in Parkinson's disease (PD), the early onset of olfactory dysfunction in both PD and Alzheimer's (AD), the occurrence of Lewy body pathology in gut neurons, the early involvement of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus in PD, the influence of bacterial amyloid on Alpha synuclein (AS) aggregation and neuroinflammation, the presence of AS aggregates in the appendix, the protective effect of antibiotics on AD phenotype in transgenic mice, the diminished disease presentation in germ-free animals bearing pathogenic PD and AD mutations, and evidence that amyloid beta is an highly conserved effector molecule of innate immunity. This session will present data suggesting the molecular mechanisms of these effects not only in neurodegeneration, but in multiple sclerosis and stroke. We will review the gut-brain microbiome axis and present evidence demonstrating the molecular mechanisms of these effects. The diverse approaches which are being explored for prevention and treatment based on bacterial influences on the brain will be discussed.

Objective(s):

  • To understand the complex nature of the microbiota, and its influence on human metabolism and immunity.
    Understand leading research in the microbiome in neurodegenerative disease (especially PD and AD), multiple sclerosis and stroke.
    Become familiar with diverse approaches being explored for prevention and treatment based on bacterial influences on the brain.

Speaker(s):